Georgia congressional candidate faces residency questions

Georgia congressional candidate faces residency questions

Residency is again an issue for this year’s Democratic Party candidate challenging U.S. Rep. Karen Handel, R-Ga. Only a year after Democrat candidate Jon Ossoff– who never moved into the suburban Atlanta 6th Congressional District– was defeated by Handel, challenger Lucy McBath is facing probing questions raised by the Handel camp and journalists. InsiderAdvantage has learned that McBath’s family is claiming a homestead exemption on property in Cobb County, while being registered to vote in Tennessee and not Georgia. Her family has registered personal vehicles in Tennessee, further calling into question her residence and eligibility for homestead exemption. Consider these specifics: 1) In a May 1 public debate McBath said that her husband was a permanent resident of Tennessee. Yet Curtis McBath has claimed a homestead exemption in Cobb County, Georgia, since 2002. So here’s a question now being asked: How many years did the McBath family financially benefit from a tax exemption to which they were not legally entitled while residents of another state? 2) The McBath’s cars appear to be still registered in Blount County, Tennessee. Curtis McBath is still registered to vote in Tennessee. Georgia law requires those claiming homestead exemption to register cars owned at the same address. If registering to vote, homestead also determines residency. How do the McBaths explain continuing to receive the homestead exemption without meeting these requirements? Both Democrat and GOP political observers agree that Ossoff’s candidacy was hurt since he did not have close ties or lived in the 6th Congressional District. That’s why longtime resident Handel believes that the district’s voters again have a right to know the truth...
Georgia’s Pro-Business Reputation Hurt by Rising Crime

Georgia’s Pro-Business Reputation Hurt by Rising Crime

According to an analysis from CNBC, Georgia has dropped from No. 2 to No. 7 in its annual “America’s Top States for Business” scorecard. This is a shocker, especially since Gov. Nathan Deal and other state leaders tout Site Selection magazine’s repeated designation of Georgia as the “No. 1 state in which to do business.” The reason from Georgia’s drop? Rising crime. CNBC scored all 50 states on more than 60 measures of competitiveness, developed with input from various business and policy experts, official government sources, the CNBC Global CFO Council and the states themselves. But although Georgia’s economy is strong, the news outlet reports, “an uptick in costs and violent crime bruise the Peach State’s competitive edge.” Georgia received an A-plus grade in the “workforce” and “economy” categories but a C-minus in “education” and a D grade for “quality of life.” Atlanta, especially, has seen a dramatic rise in shootings and murders over the past six months, far outstripping last’s years shootings and murder rate from January to through June 2017. In fact, a private probation option for Fulton County juvenile offenders may end due to outrage over a sensational July 13 murder and robbery at the Capital City country club. State Rep. Beth Beskin, R-Atlanta, wants to end the permissive private system after hearing from over 100 residents at a meeting with Fulton County prosecutors. One outraged resident called the private probation system “insane” and that the Capital City shooting underscores the danger to the public. Beskin’s comments follow the shooting of Christian Broder during an armed robbery outside the country club, and he later died. Two...
A GA GOP Runoff Post-Mortem

A GA GOP Runoff Post-Mortem

With Republican gubernatorial nominee Brian Kemp riding high after his huge victory over Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle in last month’s runoff, it is interesting to note data in all three of the GOP races. The turnout for governor was only a 4 percent decline from May (from about 607,000 to 585,000). I was thinking around 500,000-520,000 would return to the polls, but that turned out to be low. Obviously, a lot of folks– -no matter who they voted for in May— came back to the polls. Kemp got about 251,000 more votes in the runoff than in May (about 406,000 on Tuesday and 155,000 in May). President Donald Trump, extremely popular with Georgia Republicans, no doubt delivered the knockout blow to the already-sputtering Cagle campaign with his official endorsement of Kemp. The GOP lieutenant governor’s runoff ended up 50-50, with Geoff Duncan edging out David Shafer by some 1,700 votes. Regarding Shafer’s race, consider these astounding three-county metro Atlanta numbers (comparing his margin over Duncan in May versus July):                 May Margin        July Margin COBB           +10,825          +1,676 FULTON       +8,530            +1,393 GWINNETT  +14,111          +4,511 Notice the Shafer meltdown in his home base of Gwinnett County. His margin over Duncan dropped by a whopping 9,600 votes (from 14,111 to 4,511). If the state senator had even won Gwinnett by half his May margin (about 7,000 votes), he would have won the runoff. Someone on Shafer’s campaign sure dropped the ball...
Breaking News: No Trump Endorsement in GA GOP Runoff

Breaking News: No Trump Endorsement in GA GOP Runoff

Rumors have been swirling in Georgia and Washington D.C. that President Donald Trump would make an endorsement in the hotly-contested Republican gubernatorial primary runoff, especially since early voting starts next week.Not true, as told to this writer by reliable sources close to the White House. While this is disappointing to candidates Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp, the word is that– in spite of the president’s recent successful endorsement in the South Carolina GOP runoff to help longtime Trump loyalist Gov. Henry McMaster– there will be a policy of no endorsements in GOP primaries to include Georgia. Supporters of both gubernatorial candidates for weeks have been pitching their man to the White House for a public blessing in the July 24th runoff, but their efforts have fallen...
Will Ga. Lobbyists, Others Reveal Sexual Harassment?

Will Ga. Lobbyists, Others Reveal Sexual Harassment?

2017 has been a year when sexual harassment accusations and admissions have rocked all levels of government, the media, entertainment and business. Will high-profile Georgians also be targeted? We are informed by several female lobbyists that the Atlanta Journal-Constitution has contacted them as well as an untold number of other lobbyists as well as other people working around the Capitol, to determine whether, or to what degree, the sexual harassment problem exists in the Legislature and state government. An email from the AJC to one lobbyist reads: “We know this is a difficult subject to talk about and many individuals who have faced or witnessed harassment may be reluctant to speak up for fear that their livelihoods and reputations will be hurt. But problems that remain hidden cannot be solved. We encourage anyone with knowledge of sexual harassment or misconduct to contact us. Janel Davis is the lead reporter on the investigation and she can be reached at jhdavis@ajc.com , or 301-204-0837.” The email also claims that all tips will be kept confidential and will be used only as a starting point for...