Kia stars in Super Bowl, heads for Georgia ports

Kia stars in Super Bowl, heads for Georgia ports

  For those Georgians who didn’t have a dog in the Super Bowl hunt – which was probably most of us – perhaps the most entertaining, although not surprising news of the evening was the creativity displayed in the Big Game’s commercials. One of the ads introduced – in dramatic, and impressive, fashion – a new full-size SUV to the U. S. Automobile marketplace. The 2020 Kia Telluride, which was originally debuted at a Fashion show in New York, looks as bold and masculine as any American SUV. In 2006, Kia announced it would build a new manufacturing plant in West Point, Georgia, and joined many other foreign automobile manufacturers in locating plants in the United States. The Company, Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia (KMMG), began mass production of its Sorento sedan in 2009. In 2012, the company completed an expansion that brought its total manufacturing capacity to 360,000 vehicles annually. In 2016, it began production of its Optima model. In addition to being assembled at Kia’s Lagrange plant, the Telluride also boosts another important economic asset – The Georgia Port Authority’s Savannah and Brunswick facilities in Southeast Georgia. Kia’s global supply Chain will import Telluride parts through the Authority’s Savannah Terminals, and assembled Tellurides will be shipped through the Port of Brunswick’s autoport for global markets this month. “The launch of the Kia Telluride, our largest and most refined SUV to date, will be a monumental achievement for KMMG,” said Stuart Countess, chief administrative officer and vice president of Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia. “The support we receive from the Ports Authority – with our inbound parts from our global...

Trending toward renewable energy, energy providers confronted by coal ash disposal

  In 2008, a coal ash pond dike at The Tennessee Valley Authority’s Kingston Power Plant collapsed, spilling 1.1 billion gallons of coal ash slurry into the adjacent Clinch River.  Worried observers took note.  Earlier this year, after Hurricane Florence recently barreled into South Carolina, utility Santee Cooper enlisted the help of private contractors to secure its coal ash ponds, which contain about 200,000 tons of wet ash and were in danger of spilling into the Waccamaw river. Coal ash, just like wood ash from a fireplace, or charcoal ash from an outdoor grill, is light and powdery. In its dry form, wind can spread it far and wide, which is why utilities around the world mix it with water and store it in “ash storage ponds.”  These ponds are constructed specifically for coal ash storage and are located adjacent to coal-fueled power plants – and the rivers which provide cooling water to those plants. A failure in the earthen berms that separate the Waccamaw River from the power plant’s ponds could have unleashed a plume of wet ash – which contains chemicals such as arsenic, lead and mercury – into the Waccamaw.  In February of 2014, North Carolina officials estimate up to 39,000 tons of coal ash spilled from Duke Energy’s Dan River Steam Station into the Dan River in Eden, N.C., about 80 miles upstream from the Kerr Reservoir. Ash or grey colored water was seen in the reservoir a few days after the coal ash spill, according to reports. While natural gas, nuclear, solar and wind generated electricity are expected to satisfy America’s future electric power requirements,...