Trump, rallying in Alabama, wades into a broad intraparty battle

Trump, rallying in Alabama, wades into a broad intraparty battle

By Alex Isenstadt (Politico) – HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — President Donald Trump on Friday stepped into the middle of a heated GOP primary that has deeply divided his party and has pitted the commander in chief against some of his most ardent backers. With the Alabama Senate special election just days away, the president heaped praise on Sen. Luther Strange, describing him as an unapologetic ally who would help him deliver on his agenda. “Luther is your man,” Trump told the thousands of enthusiastic supporters who packed the Von Braun Center here, imploring them to “get out and vote.” “Like all of you, Luther Strange knows the true strength of this country: It’s God, it’s family and it’s country,” Trump said. Read...
Trump: Strange has ‘gained mightily’ since my endorsement

Trump: Strange has ‘gained mightily’ since my endorsement

By Louis Nelson (Politico) – President Donald Trump predicted Friday that next week’s Alabama Republican Senate runoff “will be very close” thanks to his endorsement of Sen. Luther Strange. Strange (R-Ala.), appointed by former Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley to fill the seat left vacant by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, is running to win the seat outright in a special election but has trailed in the polls behind former state Chief Justice Roy Moore. Trump, who will campaign for Strange Friday night in Alabama, has backed the incumbent senator and Friday morning claimed that support has helped Strange narrow Moore’s lead. “Will be in Alabama tonight. Luther Strange has gained mightily since my endorsement, but will be very close. He loves Alabama, and so do I!” the president wrote on Twitter. Read...
Keep the Capitol Hill Focus on Vital Georgia Ports

Keep the Capitol Hill Focus on Vital Georgia Ports

A popular buzzword in Washington, D.C., right now is infrastructure and how we can get to our goal of seeing a plan finalized. As we continue to discuss an infrastructure plan, we must look beyond the traditional definition of “infrastructure” projects and include projects that add economic value, such as ports. The Ports of Savannah and Brunswick are economic engines for the United States, and the need to maintain and expand these cannot be overstated. In Washington, the conversation has been on the economy, creating jobs, and increasing our GDP, but we need to focus on the tools that will get us there. Our nation’s infrastructure was once the greatest in the world, from the interstate highway system under President Dwight Eisenhower to the creation of modern airports ferrying people to all parts of the globe. While those infrastructure endeavors helped to catapult the United States to a global and economic power, they are now faced with the effects of age and neglect. The demand on our nation’s ports has continued to grow, and our investment in those outlets should reflect that. The second-busiest port on the East Coast, the Port of Savannah, has also experienced record growth. Just this month, the largest ship to ever call on the Port of Savannah, the Theodore Roosevelt, made its first stop in Savannah. The arrival of that 14,414 TEU container ship marked another year of record growth for the port. While this incredible growth is credited to the Georgia Port Authority’s planning and logistics capabilities, it will soon face the problem of physical and environmental constraints. The Port of Savannah is...
McConnell’s mortal enemy might soon be in his caucus

McConnell’s mortal enemy might soon be in his caucus

By Burgess Everett (Politico) – Three words are striking fear in Senate Republicans these days: “Sen. Roy Moore.” The bomb-throwing former Alabama Supreme Court justice has vaulted to a hefty lead in Alabama’s Senate special election, lambasting Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell every step of the way. A Moore victory would no doubt make McConnell’s tenuous 52-seat majority even more precarious, allies of the majority leader warn, potentially imperiling tax reform, raising the risk of default on the nation’s debt or even derailing routine Senate business. Moore faces interim Sen. Luther Strange — whom a McConnell-aligned outside group has spent millions to elect — in a Sept. 26 Republican runoff. Read...
Brooks endorses Moore in AL Senate race

Brooks endorses Moore in AL Senate race

U.S. Congressman Mo Brooks (R) finished a distant third in Alabama’s recent Senate primary behind Luther Strange and Roy Moore, but his endorsement was eagerly sought by both remaining candidates as they looked for any edge in what looks to be a tight runoff. Well the wait is over as last week Brooks emphatically endorsed Judge Moore. Said Brooks on his decision, “The Senate race comes down to this: we are in an epic battle between the people of Alabama who put America first and the Washington swamp that hopes to buy Alabama’s Senate seat and put America second.  I have voted for Roy Moore because Roy Moore not only stands with America, he will fight for America!” The ‘Alabama vs. Washington’ refrain has been a common one in the race, which is ironic because Strange is supported by President Donald Trump, who swept into the Oval Office on a similar message of “draining the swamp.”  Trump is expected to campaign for Strange at some point before election day....
Virginia: Northam ahead, but hasn’t nailed it down

Virginia: Northam ahead, but hasn’t nailed it down

By Hastings Wyman- “There’s an anti-Trump mood,” says Carter Phillips, a lawyer and Democratic activist in Hampton, VA; “I think Northam wins this.” “Ed [Gillespie] is going to win this race,” says Morton Blackwell, the Republican National Committeeman for Virginia since 1988. That kind of optimism on the part of both parties in Virginia’s off-year gubernatorial contest suggests a hard-fought campaign between Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, a Democrat, and former GOP National Chairman Ed Gillespie. While Northam appears to be in the lead, he has not nailed down a majority, suggesting a close race when the votes are counted on the night of November 7. Opinion polls show a race that is still undecided with less than two months to go before Election Day. Northam is leading in two of the three most recent polls, and in the third, the two are tied. A Roanoke College Poll released in late August showed Northam with 43% to Gillespie’s 36%. An August 8 poll of registered voters by Virginia Commonwealth University showed Northam with 42%, Gillespie with 37% and Libertarian Cliff Hydra at 6%. Among minorities, Northam led 61% to 15%; among whites, Gillespie led 42% to 29%. And a July 25 poll by Monmouth University showed the two with 44% each. Thus, Northam mostly leads Gillespie, but his numbers – in the low to mid 40s – indicate he has not sealed the deal with voters. And Gillespie simply has not moved much beyond the state’s Republican base, scarcely more than a third of the voters. Northam is also winning the money race. The latest financial reports show that Northam...