Florida officials flag a possible violation of elections law by state Democrats

Florida officials flag a possible violation of elections law by state Democrats

By Emily Mahoney (Tampa Bay Times) – The Florida Department of State, which oversees elections, has asked federal prosecutors to look into faulty forms sent to voters in at least four counties that may have caused them to miss the deadline for fixing problems with their mail-in ballots. Emails released by the Department show that the forms appear to have been sent by the state Democratic Party. In a post-midterm season that is bubbling over with lawsuits and allegations of rampant voter fraud, this is the first instance in which state officials have flagged a possible violation of elections law. Read...
Georgia Libertarian Party – R.I.P.

Georgia Libertarian Party – R.I.P.

  As a Libertarian I find myself always confronted with a conundrum come election day: Should I vote for the Libertarian Party candidate who more closely aligns with my convictions or vote for the lesser of two evils– usually a Republican– who stands a chance of winning. Well, thanks to the choices and results in this mid-term election, this will no longer be an issue for me to grapple with in Georgia. As of this writing it appears almost certain that Brian Kemp is now our governor-elect, and that the paltry one percent vote for the Libertarian Party candidate will not be enough to force a run-off. Apparently enough Libertarians felt that the prospect of a far-left candidate like Stacey Abrams becoming our next governor was bridge too far, and that at least two out of three voters who traditionally vote Libertarian for governor choose instead to vote for the “lesser of two evils.” Historically, the Libertarian Party garners two to three percent for the top of the ticket. That wasn’t true, though, for a couple of down-ticket candidates for Secretary of State and Public Service Commissioner, District 3. The Libertarian candidates received 2.2 percent and 2.7 percent respectively– thereby forcing a December 4th runoff. In the case of Secretary of State this is especially worrisome because the risk of having a Democrat elected looms large. If that were to happen it could put Georgia in play in the 2020 presidential election, where it otherwise would not. Just imagine if Abrams was the Secretary of State instead of Kemp in this election cycle. With her strategy of enfranchising people...
‘Incompetence’: Broward election chief likely to be forced from office by Scott, DeSantis

‘Incompetence’: Broward election chief likely to be forced from office by Scott, DeSantis

By Marc Caputo (Politico) – MIAMI — Counting unlawful votes. Destroying ballots. Sunshine Law violations. Busted deadlines. So many controversies have bedeviled Broward County Elections Supervisor Brenda Snipes — culminating in her office’s troubles in the aftermath of Florida’s chaotic 2018 elections — that her days in office are now numbered, insiders and lawmakers say. She’s losing support from fellow Democrats and faces the increasing likelihood of an embarrassing suspension from office at the hands of either Gov. Rick Scott or his likely successor, Ron...
A Georgia Post-Mortem: GOP & Democrat wins

A Georgia Post-Mortem: GOP & Democrat wins

After county elections officials counted and reported absentee ballots for Tuesday’s election, Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp led Democrat Stacey Abrams by 1.6 percent— more than 64,000 votes. As first reported by InsiderAdvantage when it called his victory late Tuesday night (the first media outlet to do so), Kemp’s margin is such that the number of provisional ballots and overseas ballots will not change his win or force a run-off election. But aside from that big outcome, it is instructive to reflect on Democrat wins and GOP losses that will affect Peach State politics. One statistic that dominates all others is the divide between metro Atlanta (now consisting of 29 counties) and the rest of Georgia. Consider: * Metro Atlanta— Kemp 43 percent, Abrams 56 percent, Libertarian Ted Metz 1 percent (roughly 318,000 vote margin for Abrams) * Rest of Georgia– Kemp 61 percent, Abrams 38 percent, Metz 1 percent (roughly 381,000-vote margin for Kemp). In 2016, Democrat Hillary Clinton won metro Atlanta by 8 points (52 Clinton, 44 Donald Trump) but lost the rest of Georgia by 24 points (61 Trump, 37 Clinton). Thus, there was hardly any difference in the Trump/Kemp numbers outside metro Atlanta (2016 and 2018) but Abrams improved notably in metro Atlanta over Clinton. Some sobering statistics for the GOP and good news for Democrats: * Cobb and Gwinnett both voted Democratic for governor for the first time since 1986. Abrams won Gwinnett by 14 points (a sign the multiracial county is moving steadily into the Democratic camp). In 2016, Clinton won the county by 6 points. The GOP lost 5 State House seats...
Here’s what a recount in Florida would look like

Here’s what a recount in Florida would look like

By Kirby Wilson (Tampa Bay Times) – Recounts are the talk of Florida politics today, with the races for U.S. Senate and Florida Agriculture Commissioner — as well as a smattering of smaller races — all within a razor-thin margin. Statewide results have to be reported to the state elections office before a recount can be ordered. Between provisional and other late ballots, it might be this weekend before results are in. Read...
A Divided Dixie

A Divided Dixie

  By Hastings Wyman –   It is no longer the Solid South, for either party. Southern voters kept Republican US Senate seats in GOP hands and, assuming Rick Scott’s (R) lead holds in Florida, defeated a long-time incumbent, US Sen. Bill Nelson (D), though Nelson may seek a recount. The GOP also turned back major gubernatorial challenges, defeating two African-American Democrats for governor in both Florida and – at this writing – Georgia. Moreover, a stronger than usual Democratic effort in Oklahoma by former state Attorney General Drew Edmondson failed to overthrow the Republicans’ hammerlock on the governorship; businessman Walter Stitt (R), a political outsider, prevailed. Other Southern governorships, as expected stayed under Republican control. But beyond that rosy Republican picture in the South’s statewide races, serious weaknesses in the GOP’s majority status were revealed in yesterday’s returns. In Florida, elections are always close, so the victory of Ron DeSantis (R) over Sam Gillum (D) by one percentage point, while unexpected, was hardly historic. But in Texas, US Sen. Ted Cruz (R), a shoo-in by most pre-election accounts, narrowly kept his seat, defeating the personable Beto O’Rourke (D) by 51% to 48%, suggesting that the Lone Star State is more Purple than Red, and will be more seriously contested by Democrats in the future. Similarly, in Georgia, as this is written. Stacey Abrams (D), an African-American woman, came close to defeating the hard-right campaign of Brian Kemp (R), the kind of result unimaginable in this Deep South state only a few years ago. Democrats can also be expected to stay in the hunt in the Peach State in...