Keep the Capitol Hill Focus on Vital Georgia Ports

Keep the Capitol Hill Focus on Vital Georgia Ports

A popular buzzword in Washington, D.C., right now is infrastructure and how we can get to our goal of seeing a plan finalized. As we continue to discuss an infrastructure plan, we must look beyond the traditional definition of “infrastructure” projects and include projects that add economic value, such as ports. The Ports of Savannah and Brunswick are economic engines for the United States, and the need to maintain and expand these cannot be overstated. In Washington, the conversation has been on the economy, creating jobs, and increasing our GDP, but we need to focus on the tools that will get us there. Our nation’s infrastructure was once the greatest in the world, from the interstate highway system under President Dwight Eisenhower to the creation of modern airports ferrying people to all parts of the globe. While those infrastructure endeavors helped to catapult the United States to a global and economic power, they are now faced with the effects of age and neglect. The demand on our nation’s ports has continued to grow, and our investment in those outlets should reflect that. The second-busiest port on the East Coast, the Port of Savannah, has also experienced record growth. Just this month, the largest ship to ever call on the Port of Savannah, the Theodore Roosevelt, made its first stop in Savannah. The arrival of that 14,414 TEU container ship marked another year of record growth for the port. While this incredible growth is credited to the Georgia Port Authority’s planning and logistics capabilities, it will soon face the problem of physical and environmental constraints. The Port of Savannah is...